Ukoy Recipe Full Steps

Ukoy or okoy are Filipino-style fritters made of assorted vegetables, shell-on shrimp, and an atsuete-colored batter. The chunky mixture is dropped in sizzling oil in large spoonfuls and deep-fried until and crunchy.

These crispy patties are commonly peddled by street food vendors in wet markets as well as sold in many carinderias or restaurants. They’re served as a snack, appetizer, or side dish and traditionally enjoyed with a spiced vinegar dip on the side.

Vegetables to use

Shrimp fritters are not only simple to prepare but also versatile. The list of vegetables and root crops below are a great option to use.

  • firm tofu cubes
  • julienned kalabasa
  • shredded green papaya
  • julienned carrots
  • shredded cabbage
  • julienned sweet potatoes
  • mung bean sprouts (togue)
  • chopped green onions
  • shredded cassava
  • shredded zucchini
  • sliced shallots

Cooking tips

  • Salt the shredded papaya to dispel of excess liquid that would otherwise water down the batter and break apart the fritters during frying.
  • Cut the ingredients as thinly and evenly as possible to ensure fast and even cooking.
  • The annatto powder is mainly for color; adjust the amount according to the desired depth of color.
  • Add fish sauce for umami flavor. You can also stir in shrimp bouillon in the batter and adjust seasoning to taste.
  • For a crispy texture, use enough oil to cover the patties at least halfway. Do not overcrowd the pan and cook in batches as needed.
  • Maintain the optimal temperature of 350 to 375 F is crucial. Too high and the fritters will burn before sufficiently cooked through, too low and they will absorb more grease.
  • Use a large spoon or a small saucer to evenly portion and easily slide the batter into the hot oil.
  • To keep from falling apart, fry the fritters undisturbed for about 2 to 3 minutes until browned on the bottom and then turn with the spatula to continue to cook until browned and crispy.
  • Drain on a wire rack set and not on paper towels as the condensation will make the ukoy soggy.

How to serve

  • Serve as a midday snack or appetizer with spicy vinegar on the side for dipping.
  • As with most fried foods, they’re best enjoyed freshly cooked as they tend to lose crispness over time and do not reheat well.
  • If not eating immediately, arrange in a single layer on a baking sheet and keep warm and crispy in a 200 F oven until ready to serve.

Sizzling Gambas Receipe Full Steps

Sizzling Gambas with garlicky tomato sauce has all the big, bold flavors you’ll love! This spicy shrimp dish is easy to make and delicious as an appetizer or main entree.

Want to level up your seafood game? Gambas al ajillo are easy to make yet deliver big, bold flavors. They require simple ingredients and are ready in no time!

These spicy garlic shrimp are a great party food and just as amazing as lunch or dinner meal. The garlicky pan juices are delicious sopped up with crusty bread as well as spooned over steamed rice.

What are sizzling gambas

Sizzling gambas is a classic Spanish dish usually offered in tapa bars as an appetizer, but can also be served as a full meal with rice, pasta, or bread. Traditionally made of prawns, dry sherry, olive oil, garlic, and spices such as sweet paprika and red pepper flakes, it has been adapted to suit our local ingredients.

Like sisig, the shrimp are commonly served at the table in “sizzling” metal plates for presentation and to prolong heat.

Cooking tips

  • For best results, use shell-on shrimp and peel them yourself. Already peeled frozen shrimps tend to take on a rubbery texture when cooked. Choose the freshest seafood you can find as it will make a big difference in the flavor.
  • Drain the shrimp very well. You want them to sear nicely and not cook in their own steam.
  • Garlic is the heart of this dish, imparting a wonderful flavor and aroma to the dish, but it does burn rather quickly. As with my beef salpicao
  • In the mood for other seafood? Substitute bay scallops!
  • I use Chinese cooking in the recipe, but dry sherry, white wine, or cognac work as well. For a non-alcoholic option, you can use apple cider diluted with water.
  • You can skip the bread topping if you like, but it does add a buttery crunch to the dish. You can also toss in about one tablespoon of ground pili or almond nuts to the crumb mixture for added texture.
  • , I cook the garlic in warm (not hot) oil to draw out maximum flavor as it gently browns.
  • Once the oil is infused with flavor and the garlic is lightly brown, crank up the heat to high before adding the rest of the ingredients. You want to sear the shrimp quickly and not overcook and toughen.

How to serve

  • Serve as an appetizer with an ice-cold beer or as a main meal with steamed rice or a crusty loaf of bread.
  • Spicy shrimp in garlic is best enjoyed freshly cooked as they tend to toughen with prolonged cooking. To store for future use, skip the bread crumb topping.
  • Allow to cool completely and transfer in a container with a tight-fitting lid and keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.
  • To reheat, place the shrimp in a single layer on a lightly greased pan over medium heat. Cook for about 2 to 3 minutes on each side

Sotanghon at Bola-Bola Soup Full Recipe Steps

Sotanghon at bola-bola soup made of juicy meatballs, cellophane noodles, cabbage, and celery. This Filipino-style noodle soup is hearty and delicious on its own or as a side dish.

When I make lumpiang shanghai, I usually make twice the meat filling. These Filipino-style spring rolls freeze well and are perfect for days when I am too pressed to prepare anything elaborate for lunch or when guests drop by impromptu.

But mostly, I have the filling handy and ready in the freezer to use for other meal ideas.  This sotanghon at bola-bola soup is only a matter of defrosting the meat mixture, shaping it into balls, and a quick twenty minutes on the stove. I get a delicious and satisfying meal to enjoy in no time.

Meatball ingredients

  • The meat mixture is made of ground chicken but ground pork, beef, or turkey are also great options. Minced shrimp can also be added to boost flavor.
  • It also includes chopped green onions for color and chopped water chestnuts and shredded carrots for texture. Try adding or substituting chopped shitake mushrooms, parsley or cilantro.
  • Season soy sauce for umami flavor, and salt and pepper to balance overall taste.

Cooking tips

  • The recipe uses napa cabbage and kinchay (Chinese celery), but you can also add other vegetables in season such as patola, upo or chicharo (snow peas).
  • Make sure the water is boiling before adding the meatballs to keep from falling apart.
  • You use atsuete /annatto to add color. Soak about 1 tablespoon atsuete seeds in about 1 cup warm water go extract color and then strain in a fine-mesh sieve. Discard seeds and add annatto water to the soup.

How to serve

  • Serve the soup on its own or with puto or pandesal for midday snack. It’s also delicious for lunch or dinner as a main or side dish with steamed rice and fried fish or meat.
  • For best results,  serve the soup freshly cooked as the sotanghon tends to absorb liquid and soften as it stands.
  • To store leftovers, allow to cool completely and transfer in a container with a tight-fitting lid. Refrigerate for up to 3 days. This dish does not freeze well.
  • To reheat, place in a saucepan, add more water and adjust seasonings as needed. Heat to an internal temperature of 165 F.

Ginisang Togue at Tokwa Full Recipe Steps

Ginisang Togue at Tokwa is easy to make and cooks in minutes. This vegetable stir-fry with crisp tofu is a fantastic side dish and is nutritious as it is delicious.

This vegetable stir-fry is one of my favorite side dishes. Not only is it quick and easy to make, but it’s also budget-friendly and healthy.

Soybeans are an inexpensive source of protein; bean sprouts and tofu provide a vegetarian dinner option that’s nutritious as it is delicious. Each serving of this dish is only 184 kcal!

Vegetable ingredients

It uses only a handful of ingredients and is customizable to what you have on hand. Below are some suggestions.

  • Green beans (Bagiuo beans), cut thinly on a bias
  • Celery, sliced thinly
  • Snow peas
  • Shitake mushrooms, cut into strips
  • Scallions, cut into two-inch lengths

Cooking tips

  • For best results, drain the tofu well and pat dry with paper towels to rid of excess moisture.
  • Cut the carrots in thin strips to ensure quick cooking.
  • The bean sprouts just need a few stirs; remove from heat immediately as they will continue to cook in their residual heat.
  • Stir-fry on high heat to keep the vegetables from overcooking in the steam
  • Do not add water or liquid as the bean sprouts have very high water content and will expel liquid.

How to serve

  • I like to double the recipe and serve half as a side dish for lunch and dinner with steamed rice and fried fish or grilled pork. The remaining portion I use as filling for lumpiang prito to enjoy as midday merienda throughout the day.
  • Due to loss of texture, this stir-fry is best served freshly cooked. To store leftovers, allow to cool completely and transfer in a container with a tight-fitting lid. It should keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Unfortunately, this dish does not freeze well.
  • To reheat, place in a wide pan over high heat and stir regularly until completely heated through. Or warm in the microwave at 1 to 2-min intervals until heated through.

Lumpiang Prito Full Recipe Steps

Lumpiang Prito are a tasty snack or appetizer the whole family will love. Filled with tofu and vegetables, these crispy spring rolls are nutritious as they are delicious!

Lumpia are a variety of spring rolls that are popular in the Philippines as snacks for between meals or as appetizers for gatherings and special occasions.

The fillings range from savory meat, seafood, and vegetables to sweet fruits and wrapped in soft homemade crepe or paper-thin commercial pastry skins. They’re served fresh with a generous smothering of a sweet and savory brown sauce or eaten fried with a spicy vinegar on the side for dipping.

This lumpiang prito, which translates to “fried spring roll,” is the third version on the blog. While mostly similar in preparation, different proteins give them variety.

How to serve As with most fried food foods, Filipino spring rolls are best served freshly cooked as they tend to lose their crispness over time. Serve as a midday snack or party appetizer with spicy vinegar or agre dulce (sweet and sour sauce) for dipping. How to store To make ahead, prepare the vegetable filling, drain well, and refrigerate. Wrap when ready to fry. You can also assemble the spring rolls beforehand. Place in an airtight container and refrigerate for up to 3 days. To freeze, arrange uncooked spring rolls in a single layer with some space in between on a baking sheet. Wrap tightly with cling wrap and freeze until firm. Transfer in a resealable bag or airtight container and keep in the freezer for up 2 months

One is made with ground pork, the other with diced pork and shrimp, and this version uses crisp-fried tofu for a vegan treat. Make sure to give them all a try!

Lumpiang gulay can include almost any medley of vegetables you like.

Vegetable choices

  • Green beans
  • Sweet potato or Japanese yam (camote)
  • Potatoes
  • Bean Sprouts
  • Carrots
  • Singkamas
  • Cabbage
  • Celery
  • Chayote
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions and garlic

Cooking tips

  • Cut the vegetables in uniform size to ensure even cooking.
  • Keep the vegetables a bit underdone as they will continue to cook in their residual heat as well as during the final frying.
  • Drain the vegetable filling well and cool completely before wrapping as the excess moisture or steam will tear the spring roll wrapper. Place the drained mixture in the refrigerator for a few minutes to cool quickly and to keep from cooking further.
  • Cover the wrappers with a damp cloth while assembling to prevent from drying out.
  • Roll the spring rolls tightly and snugly to keep the oil from seeping in. Do not overfill to prevent from bursting.
  • Use enough frying oil to cover the rolls fully. Use oil with a high smoke point such as canola, safflower or peanut oil.
  • Maintain the optimal temperature of 350 F to 375 F. If the oil is too hot, the wrappers will burn before sufficiently cooked. Too low, and the lumpia will absorb a lot more grease. Cook in batches to prevent the oil from plummeting.
  • Do not drain on paper towels as this will make them soggy. Drain on a wire rack set over a baking sheet or in a fine-mesh sieve set over a bowl.

How to serve

  • As with most fried food foods, Filipino spring rolls are best served freshly cooked as they tend to lose their crispness over time.
  • Serve as a midday snack or party appetizer with spicy vinegar or agre dulce (sweet and sour sauce) for dipping.

How to store

    • To make ahead, prepare the vegetable filling, drain well, and refrigerate. Wrap when ready to fry.
    • You can also assemble the spring rolls beforehand. Place in an airtight container and refrigerate for up to 3 days.
    • To freeze, arrange uncooked spring rolls in a single layer with some space in between on a baking sheet. Wrap tightly with cling wrap and freeze until firm. Transfer in a resealable bag or airtight container and keep in the freezer for up 2 months

Mango and Cream Cheese Turon Full Recipe Steps

Mango and Cream Cheese Turon is a delicious twist on our classic lumpia dessert. Perfectly sweet, crispy, and creamy, it’s a tasty fruit treat that’s sure to be a hit!

I’ve been trying, like, forever, to introduce G to the Filipino cuisine but without success. If I had a nickel for every time something akin to terror flits through his big blue eyes when I offer him a bite of my frog legs, chicken feet, and pig jowls, I’ll be by now driving a Ferrari.

But although the dude seldom steps beyond his comfort food of steak and potatoes, he has developed a deep love for banana turon. He would hover around me when I fry these dessert spring rolls and would easily polish half a dozen straight off the pan.

Yesterday, however, he was craving for some but we didn’t have any saba bananas on hand. He looked so disappointed that I had to be resourceful.

I spied two perfectly ripe Philippine mangoes on the counter and a block of cream cheese in the fridge and had a brilliant light bulb moment! The mango and cream cheese turon turned out so good; they didn’t even make it to the table.

How to wrap spring rolls

  • On a clean, flat work surface, lay a wrapper in a diamond shape with one corner facing you.
  • Roll a slice of mango in sugar and arrange horizontally about 2 inches from the bottom corner of the wrapper. Place a strip of cream cheese lengthwise on top of the mango.
  • Fold the bottom corner over the filling and then fold in sides. Starting at the bottom, roll up the wrapper to form a tight log around the filling.
  • Lightly wet the top corner of the wrapper with water and press to seal.

Cooking tips

  • For the best texture and taste, use Manila mangoes and choose ones that are ripe but still firm.
  • Thaw the lumpia wrappers and carefully peel apart. While working, cover the remaining wrappers with a damp kitchen or paper towel to keep from drying out.
  • Use oil with high smoke points such as canola or corn oil for frying. Use enough oil to cover the turon rolls fully.
  • Maintain temperature at 350 F to 375 F. If too low, the lumpia will absorb a lot more grease. If too high, the wrappers will burn before fully cooked.
  • Drain on a metal colander or wire rack and not on paper towels as they’ll stick.

How to serve

  • Mango cream cheese spring rolls are delicious as a snack or dessert. Serve with ice cream or coconut caramel sauce for an amazing sweet treat!
  • They’re best eaten freshly cooked as they tend to lose crispness over time.
  • To keep from getting soggy, store the fried turon uncovered.

Ginisang Pusit Full Recipe Steps

Ginisang Pusit made of squid cooked in juicy tomatoes and onions. This classic Filipino seafood dish is easy to prepare and so flavorful. Perfect with steamed rice!

I have several squid recipes I regularly make such as inihaw, crispy-fried, or a la sisig, but although they’re all great ways to enjoy this seafood, my top choice is adobo-style with gata. The combination of tender pusit and a spicy coconut sauce never fails to hit the spot, especially when paired with heaps of steamed rice.

However, on days when I am looking for something less creamy and sinful, this ginisang pusit is the next best thing. It’s just as tasty and flavorful yet without the extra calories and fat from coconut milk.

How to clean squid

  • Hold the tail tube portion of the squid and with fingers and pull the cuttlebone (the thin, clear cartilage inside the tube) from inside the body, leaving the ink sack intact.
  • To keep the squid from discoloring, you can peel the spotted outer membrane if you like.
  • Rinse under cold running water and drain well. Cut the body into rings by slicing vertically or leave whole.

Cooking tips

  • One sure way to ruin squid is to overcook it. Cook in the vinegar briefly and just until color changes as it will finish off when sauteed with tomatoes.
  • When boiling in vinegar, do not cover or stir to mellow the strong acid taste.
  • To boost flavor, add a tablespoon of oyster sauce during the last minute or two of cooking.
  • For a spicy version, add chopped chili peppers or dried red pepper flakes.

How to serve

  • It’s delicious as a pulutan with ice-cold beer or as a main meal with steamed rice.
  • Store leftovers in airtight containers and keep in the refrigerator for up to three days.
  • To reheat, use a wide pan to allow quick reheating and not overcook the squid. Heat over medium heat to an internal temperature of 165 F.

Adobong Manok sa Patis Full Recipe Steps

Adobong Manok sa Patis is an adobo version seasoned with vinegar, fish sauce, and spices. It’s simple to make yet full of flavor you’ll love with steamed rice.

I am not a very organized shopper. I’ll go into a store and come out with a thousand things other than what I came in for. I usually end up with a cartful of things I have a pantry full of and none of what I am missing.

This adobo sa patis recipe is the result of one occasion when I was intent on making adobo and had the chicken already cut up, only to find myself out of soy sauce but with two unopened bottles of fish sauce. Since I was set on enjoying the savory flavors of my favorite dish, I proceeded using patis instead.

I have to say, it turned out better than I expected and it is now my preferred way to cook chicken adobo even with soy sauce in the pantry. It’s easy to make yet full of umami flavors you won’t be able to get enough of!

Cooking tips

  • Cut the chicken into uniform size to ensure even cooking,
  • Although you can combine everything together in a pot and simmer away, I like to first sear the chicken before adding the marinade as the browned bits add incredible flavor.
  • Give the fish sauce a few minutes to boil before adding the vinegar to mellow the “fishy” taste.
  • Allow the vinegar to boil, uncovered and without stirring, before adding the water to cook off the strong acidity.

How to serve

  • Serve as a main dish with steamed rice and a side of atchara for a hearty and tasty lunch or dinner.
  • Adobo is a great make-ahead meal. Stored in resealable bags or airtight containers, it will keep in the refrigerator for up to three days or in the freezer for up 2 months.
  • To reheat, place in a saucepan and heat over medium heat to an internal temperature of 165 F.

Chicken Tapa Full Recipe Steps

Chicken tapa marinated in soy sauce, lemon juice, and fresh garlic. Serve with garlic fried rice and sunny side up eggs for a delicious morning treat!

If you love the tangy and savory flavors of tapa, this chicken version needs to be on your cooking list! Marinated in the same mixture of soy sauce, citrus juice, and copious amounts of garlic, boneless and skinless chicken thigh meat turns out equally delicious and full-flavored as its beef counterpart.

Not only is it just as tasty, but chicken tapa is also more budget-friendly and a great alternative if you’re refraining from red meat.

Ingredients for Chicken Tapa

  • Lemon or calamansi juice-tenderizes the meat and adds a tangy taste
  • Soy sauce-acts as a brining agent and boosts umami flavors
  • Fresh minced garlic-brings another layer of flavor; substitute 1 tablespoon of garlic powder if fresh cloves are not available
  • Sugar-balances the acidic component with a hint of sweetness; helps caramelize the meat
  • Salt-rounds up the salty flavor and acts as a brining agent along with the soy sauce
  • Pepper-adds a kick of heat
  • Chicken-breast tends to get dry quickly; use boneless, skinless thigh meat for more fat and flavor

Tips on How to Make Chicken Tapa

  • Chicken breasts tend to overcook and dry out quickly. Use boneless, skinless chicken leg or thigh meat for best flavor and texture.
  • Due to the acids in the marinade, it’s best to use non-reactive material for marinating such as a plastic, stainless steel or glass bowl.
  • The recipe uses lemon juice but vinegar, pickle juice or wine will work as well.
  • I don’t recommend marinating longer than overnight as the acids in the lemon juice will denature the meat, turning it mushy. I find an average of 4 to 6 hours (or overnight at best) of marination enough to impart desired flavors.
  • If you want to freeze the tapa for future use, drain the chicken from the liquid and store in resealable bags or airtight containers.
  • The tapa can be pan-fried on the stove or grilled over hot coals until lightly browned and cooked through.
  • For food safety, use a thermometer to accurately gauge doneness. Insert a meat thermometer into the thickest part of the meat; the safe internal temperature for cooked chicken is 165 Fahrenheit (75° Celsius).

How to Serve Tapa

As with tocino and longganisa, tapa is best served with garlic fried and sunny side eggs for a delicious all-day breakfast meal.  To complete the delicious experience, the hearty combo is usually enjoyed alongside condiments such as tomato salad, spicy vinegar or atchara.

Sinangag Full Recipe Steps

Sinangag is the perfect use for day-old rice. Hot and toasty with loads of crispy garlic bits, this Filipino-style fried rice is delicious for breakfast or any time of the day meal.

Since I updated my tocino, longganisa, and tapa recipes with brand new photos and cooking tips, I thought I’d go ahead and revamp my sinangag post as well. Because what goes better with these Filipino cured meats than hot and toasty garlic fried rice?

One of my favorite kitchen hacks is cooking double the steamed rice and storing half in the freezer for future meals. This trick has saved my sanity on many occasions. When I’m too busy or too lazy to prepare an elaborate meal for the family, I just a thaw bag of my pre-cooked rice and toss it with other odds and ends in the fridge into a hearty and filling stir-fry.

Most of my previous stash, however, is used to make sinangag. My top meal of the day is breakfast and what better meal to wake up to than a hefty plate of Filipino silog? Seriously, what can be more delightful to the senses than the fragrant aroma of toasted garlic?

Tips on How to Make Garlic Fried Rice

  • A wok or a wide pan with slanted sides works best for stir-fries to allow easy distribution of ingredients without spills.
  • Use cold, leftover cooked rice. Day-old rice has less moisture and firmer grains, making it easier to separate and prevents it from turning into mush when stir-fried. If you need to use freshly cooked rice, spread it out in a thin layer on a baking sheet and stick in the fridge for a few hours to dry out and completely cool.
  • Use the right kind and right amount of oil. You want the fried rice to have a slight sheen but not overly greasy. Use oils with a neutral flavor and high smoke points such as peanut, grapeseed, canola or corn oil.
  • Cook the garlic in low heat so they’ll infuse the oil with flavor before browning.
  • After the garlic has browned, set burners on high heat before adding rice to prevent the grains from sticking to the surface and to give the dish a nice toasty flavor.
  • Feel free to garnish the sinangag with extra crispy garlic and chopped green onions.

How to Serve Sinangag

Sinangag is traditionally prepared for breakfast as a way to make use of leftover rice from last night’s dinner.

Although it is usually served as a component of the classic Filipino meal, silog, this Filipino-style garlic rice is also a great side dish to other lunch or dinner viands such as chicken adobo, fried pork chops or beef pares.